Shilton CR Series Reel

R2,738.00R7,575.00

NOTE RE STOCK AVAILABILITY ON BACKORDERBlack and Titanium reels are generally in stock at factory and we will despatch directly from there to you unless you need backing and line spooled. Anodised colours take 4/5 weeks as they need to be anodised

SKU: Shilton CR Reel Category:

Shilton CR Series Reel is the newest reel in the Shilton freshwater line up is the CR series, which is available in CR2-CR4 for line weights 3 to 8.

The super large arbor design offers rapid, yet smooth line retrieval and less line memory.

The CR4 has the same technical design features as the other CR sizes but has been increased in size and surface area offering more drag for those larger freshwater species.

The CR4 is proving to be popular amongst anglers who are targeting tigerfish, bass and large Salmonoid species with 7 and 8 weight rods.

Shilton CR Series Reel has a contemporary design without sacrificing function or rugged durability.

See the video
See our other Shilton Reels alike the SL and SR series.
Here they are in action catching the 'gangsters of the flats'.

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CR Series – Ultra Large Arbor Freshwater
The newest reel in the Shilton freshwater line up is the CR series, which is available in CR2-CR4 for line weights 3 to 8. The super large arbor design offers rapid, yet smooth line retrieval and less line memory. Apart from the CR4, this series has the same drag design as the CL and CK.

The CR4 has the same technical design features as the other CR sizes but has been increased in size and surface area offering more drag for those larger freshwater species. The CR4 is proving to be popular amongst anglers who are targeting tigerfish, bass and large Salmonoid species with 7 and 8 weight rods. The CR reels have a contemporary design without sacrificing function or rugged durability.

Although the CR range has a super large arbor and naturally looks bigger than their freshwater cousins they are perfectly balanced with their recommended line weights and are lighter than the CK range. The line retrieval, both incoming and outgoing, is silent.

The CR series is currently available in black and titanium.

PRODUCTMETRICIMPERIAL
Diameter / Weight / Line weight / BackingDiameter / Weight / Line weight / Backing
CR28.8cm / 127g / 3-4 / WF3 F + 60m 20# / WF4 F + 50m 20lbs3,5” / 4,5oz / 3-4 / WF3 F + 65yd 20# / WF4 F + 55 yd. 20lbs
CR39.7cm / 140g / 5-6 / WF5 F + 140m 20# / WF6 F + 100m 20lbs3,8” / 4,9oz / 5-6 / WF5 F + 155yd 20# / WF6 F + 110 yd. 20lbs
CR410.6cm / 156g / 7-8 / W75 F + 160m 30# / WF8 F + 140m 30lbs4,2” / 5,5oz / 7-8 / 7-8 / W75 F + 175yd. 30# / WF8 F + 150yd. 30lb

Grunter on Fly
Having pretty much got addicted to chasing Grunter, and the Breede River becoming a fast favourite of mine, I had another visit in December before heading off to Plettenberg bay. The tides weren't ideal for grunter, and boat traffic was high (my excuse anyway) so I blanked on the grunter, but did manage a couple of steenbrass, by fishing 'down and across'. When the incoming tide washes across a sandbank and creates a patch of dirty water, I figured that grunter may sit there and wait for food to be washed off the flats. Thus, I cast across into the clear water of the channel and let the fly swing across into the murky water. By letting out more line on each cast you can pretty much cover the whole area until you find the fish. The grunter (if they were there) weren't interested, but as mentioned a pair of small steenbrass were.

On the drive to Plett, I was imagining, or fantasizing about being surrounded by tailing grunter in the keurbooms river like I was in April. The spring tide came and went with nary a grunter to be seen. Things got so desperate I bought the kids a prawn pump, and in one day we got to catch and release about 47
prawns, with one 'streepie' to show for it.

On a walk up the beach from Buffels Bay we crossed the Goukamma River and headed towards Sedgefield. On the way I noticed a lot of channels in the sand quite close the beach, some with slow water full of mullet, and others with fast rips. Having had nothing but abject failure on the Keurbooms (blame the boat traffic again) we decided to give the beach a try. When we got there, conditions were completely different, the swell had picked up and those predator luring schools of mullet were no where to be seen. In the sand 'gullies' however there were fish flashing, but much broader than mullet. When charlies and clousers had come up empty, I tied on the prawn pattern and tried to get it to drift with the current, and that didn't work either.
In a moment of inspiration I pulled in most of my line and let the prawn drift in and out of the channel with the wash of the surf, following it down the beach. It wasn't long before it got picked up by a sand steenbrass. After that a fish was brought it reasonable regularly, and then even a proper spotted grunter, even if it was a small one.

Think out the box, and experiment! Shilton CR Series Reel

Testing the Floating Felt Grunter Fly
Last weekend had me down at the Breede River mouth with one thing on my agenda. Grunter.
The Leeries and Kob would take their seats at the back of the bus, while I was on a grunter mission. Late Friday afternoon I was on the sand flats waiting for the tide to rise, but for some strange reason it was taking its time. When it did start moving up, the grunter went on the prod, but on the other side of the channel, nothing on my side. There were a few odd fish tailing far from me, but it got dark and a nice potjie was waiting for me.
At sparrow's on Saturday I headed for the mudbank, and had a chat to some other fly fisherman on the way. Conrad & Stephen had both got good kob and leeries, but as I said, I was on a mission.

The tide was low and pushing and their were small grunter splashing in the shallows, but experience has shown me that these are quite spooky. As a general rule, the shallower the water the spookier the fish. Wading out into deeper water there were bigger fish, and I cast out the floating prawn fly 'upstream' and let it drift towards the fish, just retrieving enough to keep contact.
After a few attempts a grunter charged it down with a splash, and I was on to the first fish of the morning. After some quick pics of a nice sized grunter it was released and I headed back to my spot.

In pretty quick succession I had about five more charges at my fly with a solid bump, which didn't hook up properly, but it was certainly exciting to see the bronze backs come out the water as they hammered the fly. It was then discovered that my hook was bent a bit too far open, and after I straightened it I landed two more fish in relatively quick succession. All the fish took the fly aggressively as it drifted towards them with a slow retrieve. At least two of them attacked the fly on a 'blind cast'. It then went quiet and I headed back for breakfast.

The next day I met 'Agent Smith' at the spot. The tide was a bit further out, but no fish moving at all. We moved to another bay where there were small fish tailing, but had no success. My guess it was that the water was so muddy there that they had no chance of seeing the fly. What I didn't try was a faster retrieve. But no luck and shortly after we got there they went quiet. Agent Smith suggested that they went quiet when the sun hit the water, which made a lot of sense. The day before had been quite overcast which extended the fishing time.

The prawn fly has certainly proved that it works on mudflats, but still has to be tested on the sandbanks. I have a winner here.